Senior research associates

The RLI’s network of senior research associates aims to facilitate collaborative work between established scholars. It also provides a forum for research dissemination to advance the boundaries of their respective fields of study by feeding into national and international policy on the protection of refugees and displaced persons.

 

Dr Caroline Abu Sa'Da

Caroline Abu-Sada is Director of the Research Unit of MSF Switzerland. She has worked on food security and has coordinated programs in the field, notably in the Middle East, for Oxfam GB, the United Nations and MSF Switzerland. Dr Abu-Sada is the author of "ONG palestiniennes et construction étatique, l’expérience de Palestinian Agricultural Relief Committees (PARC) dans les Territoires occupés palestiniens, 1983- 2005", "In the Eyes of Others. How People in Crises Perceive Humanitarian Aid", "Le développement, une affaire d'ONG? Associations, Etats et Bailleurs dans le monde arabe”, “Dilemmas, Challenges, and Ethics of Humanitarian Action”, Mc Gill-Queen's University Press, 2012. She has also written numerous papers, reports and chapters on humanitarian action, NGOs and the Middle East, and has taught political science at New York University, Paris and at Sciences Po, Lille. Her latest publications are Abu Sa’Da, Duroch, Taithe, « Attacks on medical missions: overview of a polymorphous reality: the case of Médecins Sans Frontières », International Review of the Red Cross, 95 :889, 2014 and « L’urgence d’une souveraineté alimentaire », in Rony Brauman’s Manifeste pour les Palestiniens, Paris, Editions Autrement, October 2014.

Email: Caroline.ABU-SADA@geneva.msf.org
Web: http://www.msf-ureph.ch/en/team

 

Professor Deborah E. Anker

Deborah Anker is Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Harvard Law School Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program (HIRC).  She has taught law students at Harvard for over 25 years.  Author of a leading treatise, Law of Asylum in the United States, Anker has co-drafted ground-breaking gender asylum guidelines and amicus curiae briefs.  Professor Anker is one of the most widely known asylum scholars and practitioners in the United States; she is cited frequently by international and domestic courts and tribunals, including the United States Supreme Court.  In 2011, she was chosen to be a fellow of the prestigious American Bar Foundation. Deborah Anker is a pioneer in the development of clinical legal education in the immigration field, training students in direct representation of refugees and creating a foundation for clinics at law schools around the country.

Email: danker@law.harvard.edu
Web: http://www.law.harvard.edu/faculty/directory/index.html?id=539

 

Dr Roland Bank

RRoland Bank has been working with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) since 2005 where he currently is heading the protection unit of the Representation in Germany (Berlin). In the academic year 2012/13 and while on leave from UNHCR, he held the position of a Lecturer in International Human Rights Law and Refugee Law at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford. From 2011 to 2014, he taught international human rights and refugee law at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin as a guest lecturer. Before joining UNHCR, he worked as the legal adviser of a German foundation carrying out a world-wide programme of compensatory payments for victims of National Socialist injustice. He held academic positions in various institutions including the Max-Plank-Institute for Comparative Public and Public International Law in Heidelberg, the European University Institute in Florence and the Max-Planck-Institute for International Criminal Law in Freiburg. He studied law in Tübingen and Freiburg and holds a PhD from the University of Freiburg. He has published broadly on international human rights law and refugee law.

Email: bank@unhcr.org

 

Bruce Burson

Bruce Burson is a senior member of the New Zealand Immigration and Protection Tribunal. Prior to the establishment of the IPT in late 2010, he was a senior member of the New Zealand Refugee Status Appeals Authority. He has worked as a refugee lawyer for a number of years in both the UK and New Zealand. For past six years, Bruce has focused on the protection and migration issues relating to environmental degradation and natural disasters, including through the effects of climate change. In his judicial capacity, Bruce has written a number of decisions on the interface between environmentally-related displacement and access to refugee and complementary protection mechanisms. Outside his judicial capacity, Bruce  has worked with agencies such as  UNHCR and IOM on the human mobility implications of climate change, as well as with NGOs such as Displacement Solutions. 

Email: bruceburson@me.com

 

Professor Vincent Chetail

Vincent Chetail is Professor of Public International Law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (Geneva). He is Director of the Programme for the Study of Global Migration and was formerly the Research Director of the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights. His main fields of interest relate to human rights law, international humanitarian law, refugee law and international migration law. Prof. Chetail is Editor-in-Chief of Refugee Survey Quarterly (Oxford University Press) and General Editor of the book series “Organisation internationale et relations internationales” (Bruylant,Brussels).

Email: vincent.chetail@graduateinstitute.ch
Web: http://graduateinstitute.ch/globalmigration/Home/Whoweare/Chetail.html

 

Dr Jeff Crisp

Dr Jeff Crisp is an expert analyst on refugee, migration and humanitarian issues. He has held senior positions with UNHCR, where he was Head of Policy Development and Evaluation, Refugees International (Senior Director for Policy and Advocacy) and the Global Commission on International Migration (Director of Policy and Research). He has also worked for the Independent Commission on International Humanitarian Issues, the British Refugee Council and Coventry University. Dr Crisp has first-hand experience of refugee situations and humanitarian operations throughout the world and has published and lectured extensively on refugee, migration and humanitarian issues. He holds a Masters degree and PhD in African Studies and Political Science from the University of Birmingham and is a Honorary Professor at the University of Sussex. He is currently based at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

 

Dr Cathryn Costello

Dr Cathryn Costello B.C.L., (N.U.I.), LL.M. (Bruges), B.L. (Honorable Society of King’s Inns), DPhIl (Oxon.) is a fellow of Worcester College, Oxford and a member of the Faculty of Law of the University of Oxford. She tutors Constitutional and EU law and also teaches parts of the BCL International & European Employment Law course.  From 1998-2003 she was Lecturer in European Law at the Law School, Trinity College Dublin. From 2000-2003, she also held the position of Director of the Irish Centre for European Law.   She has been a Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco and a visiting research fellow at NYU School of Law.   She has assisted a number of NGOs in the immigration and asylum fields, and was a member of the Board of the Irish Refugee Council and the Steering Committee of the Immigrant Council of Ireland. She is currently on ILPA’s (Immigration Law Practitioners’ Association) European Group.  She has published widely on many aspects of EU refugee, asylum and immigration law, including asylum procedures, EU Citizenship and third country national family members and family reunification.     Her monograph on EU immigration and asylum law is due to be published in OUP’s Studies in European Law series in 2013.     She has acted as a research consultant on refugee and human rights law matters to the European Parliament, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, and the UNHCR.

Email: cathryn.costello@law.ox.ac.uk
Web: http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/profile/costelloc

 

Professor Heaven Crawley

Heaven Crawley is Professor of International Migration at Coventry University’s Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations where she leads a team of researchers working on issues of migration, displacement and belonging. Heaven was previously head of asylum and immigration research at the UK Home Office, Associate Director of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) and Director of the Centre for Migration Policy Research (CMPR) at Swansea University. Heaven has written and published extensively on a wide range of asylum and immigration issues including the causes of forced migration to Europe, gender issues in procedures for Refugee Status Determination, access to legal advice and representation, public attitudes towards asylum and immigration issues and children’s experiences of immigration controls, including detention, guardianship and the process of age assessment. She was a founder member of the Refugee Women’s Legal Group (RWLG) which was established in the UK in 1996 by feminist scholars, lawyers and activists concerned about the marginalisation of gender issues in procedures for Refugee Status Determination. The group produced gender guidelines for the determination of asylum claims in the UK which eventually led the Home Office to produce its own gender guidelines in 2004.

Email: heaven.crawley@coventry.ac.uk
Web: http://www.coventry.ac.uk/research/research-directories/researchers/professor-heaven-crawley/

 

Jean-François Durieux

Jean-François Durieux, holder of a Law Degree from the Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium), has taught international human rights and refugee law at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (UK) from 2007 to 2012. In 2011 he completed a long career with UNHCR, which included a wide array of field positions as well as legal advice, policy and management responsibilities at the Organisations’ Headquarters in Geneva. In addition to regular participation in conferences, seminars and  workshops in representation of UNHCR, Jean-Francois started in the 1990′s publishing the findings of his “operational” research on some of the challenges  faced by UNHCR in Central America, East Africa and other regions in which he worked.  In recent years, his research interest has focused on legal responses to mass influxes of refugees, including a comparison of African and European regimes; the concept and measurement of humanitarian protection; and the legal implications of refugee emergencies and protracted refugee situations.

Email: jean-francois.durieux@iihl.org
Web: http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/people/associates/jean-francois-durieux

 

Professor Terje Einarsen 

Terje Einarsen is professor in law at University of Bergen (Norway). He holds a Ph.D. (Doctor Juris) from the University of Bergen and a master’s degree (LL.M.) from Harvard Law School. Einarsen was formerly a judge at the general Gulating High Court for the western parts of Norway, and Head of the Human Rights Committee, Norwegian Judges' Association. He has also served as a permanent member of the Grand Chamber, Immigration Board of Appeals. Einarsen has published on the subjects of human rights law, Norwegian immigration law, international refugee law, and international criminal law. Currently he leads two research programs at the Law Faculty, "Flows and Regulations" (immigration and refugee law) and "The Universal Crimes Project” (international criminal law).

Email: Terje.Einarsen@jur.uib.no
Web: http://www.uib.no/personer/Terje.Einarsen

 

Dr Michelle Foster

Dr Michelle Foster is an Associate Professor and Director of the International Refugee Law Research Programme in the Institute for International Law and the Humanities at Melbourne Law School. Her teaching and research interests are in the areas of public law, international refugee law, and international human rights law.  Michelle has published widely in the field of international refugee law, including her ground-breaking book International Refugee Law and Socio-Economic Rights: Refuge from Deprivation.  She is the co-author (with James Hathaway) of the second edition of the seminal Law of Refugee Status, to be published in 2014.

Email: m.foster@unimelb.edu.au
Web: http://www.law.unimelb.edu.au/melbourne-law-school/community/our-staff/staff-profile/username/Michelle%20Foster

 

Professor Geoff Gilbert

Geoff Gilbert is a Professor and Head of School in the School of Law and Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex. He has been Editor-In-Chief of the International Journal of Refugee Law (Oxford University Press) since 2002. He has published widely in the areas of international refugee law and international criminal law. In addition to his academic work, Geoff Gilbert has served in advisory and consultancy capacities. He has worked with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), for whom he was founding Director of Studies for the Thematic Refugees and Human Rights Course from 2005-2007. Geoff Gilbert has also carried out human rights training programs on behalf of the Council of Europe and the UNHCR in the Russian Federation, Georgia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia and Kosovo. He was Director of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) training program for judges on combating torture in Serbia and Montenegro.

Email: geoff@essex.ac.uk
Web: http://www.essex.ac.uk/law/people/academic/gilbert.shtm

 

Dr María-Teresa Gil-Bazo

Dr María-Teresa Gil-Bazo is a Lecturer in Law at Newcastle Law School, Research Associate at the Refugee Studies Centre (Oxford University) and Visiting Professor at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). She is also a Fellow of the European Law Institute and a member of the Spanish Bar Council. Her research examines the relationship between the individual and the State as subjects of international law. In particular, her research has focused on the right to asylum as a human right. Her publications include a monograph on The Right to Asylum as an Individual Human Right in International Law (1999), an article on ‘The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and the Right to be Granted Asylum in the Union’s Law’ (2008) and a Research Paper on ‘Asylum in the practice of Latin American and African States’ (2013).

Email: maria-teresa.gil-bazo@newcastle.ac.uk
Web: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/nuls/staff/profile/maria-teresa.gil-bazo

 

Professor Elspeth Guild

Elspeth Guild is Jean Monnet Professor ad personam at Queen Mary, University of London as well as at the Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands. She is also a partner at the London law firm, Kingsley Napley and an associate senior research fellow at the Centre for European Policy Studies, Brussels. She is also a visiting Professor at the College of Europe, Bruges. Her interests and expertise lies primarily in the area of EU law, in particular EU Justice and Home Affairs (including immigration, asylum, border controls, criminal law and police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters). She also researches EU privacy and data protection law and the nexus with human rights. She co-ordinates the European Commission’s Network of Experts on Free Movement of Workers. She is also co-editor of the European Journal of Migration and Law and Free Movement of Workers and of the book series Immigration and Asylum Law and Policy in Europe published by Martinus Nijhoff. Professor Guild provides regular advice to the European Parliament, the European Commission, the Council of Europe and other European and international organizations (such as the UNHCR) on free movement of persons, migration and asylum. Professor Guild is co-chair of the European Sub Committee, Immigration Law Practitioners Association (ILPA).

Email: e.guild@qmul.ac.uk
Web: http://www.law.qmul.ac.uk/staff/guild.html

 

Professor Colin Harvey

Colin Harvey is Professor of Human Rights Law, School of Law, Queen’s University Belfast. He is a member of the Academic Panel at Doughty Street Chambers in London. In 2011, he was appointed by the UK Higher Education Funding Councils to the Research Excellence Framework 2014 Panel for Law, and to the Equality and Diversity Advisory Panel. He served as Head of the Law School at Queen’s (2007-2012), as a member of Senate (2010-2012) and as Director of the Human Rights Centre (2005-2008). He has held Visiting Professorships at the London School of Economics, the University of Michigan, and Fordham University. Professor Harvey served on the Northern Ireland Higher Education Council (2002-2006), and the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (2005-2011). He has published extensively on human rights and is the General Editor of Human Rights Law in Perspective published by Hart Publishing, Oxford. He is on the editorial board of Human Rights Law Review, European Human Rights Law Review, Northern Ireland Legal Quarterly and is the Case Editor for the International Journal of Refugee Law.

Email: c.harvey@qub.ac.uk
Web: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofLaw/Staff/ProfessorColinHarvey

 

Professor Kate Jastram

Kate Jastram is Director of Research, Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law, and Lecturer in Residence at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, where she teaches courses in refugee law and international humanitarian law. Kate Jastram joined the Berkeley Law faculty in 2002. Prior to that, she was a legal advisor to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 1991 to 2001 in Geneva and in Washington, D.C. Her scholarly work explores the challenges states face in balancing protection for forced migrants with their national security concerns, by focusing on the intersections of refugee law, human rights law, international humanitarian law, and international criminal law. She currently serves on the Executive Committee of the American Society of International Law’s Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict.

Email: kjastram@law.berkeley.edu
Web: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/php-programs/faculty/facultyProfile.php?facID=56

 

Martin Jones 

Martin Jones is a lecturer in international human rights law at the Centre for Applied Human Rights at the University of York.  He previously practiced as a refugee lawyer in Canada and has held academic appointments in Canada, the USA, Egypt and Australia.  Martin has been active with refugee legal aid organisations in the Global South, including by co-founding in 2008 the Egyptian Foundation for Refugee Rights.  Martin's research examines the intersection of refugee law and refugee protection, including in particular the role of the law, the legal profession and the judiciary in the enjoyment of refugee rights in the Middle East, South East Asia, and East Asia.

Email: martin.jones@york.ac.uk
Web: http://www.york.ac.uk/cahr/about-us/our-staff/jones/

 

Professor Satvinder Juss

Satvinder Juss is Professor and Director of the MA Course in International Peace & Security in the Law School at King’s College London and specialises in International Refugee law and in Human Rights, Public law and Comparative Law. Professor Juss has taught at a number of Universities in the UK and the USA, including Harvard Law School and Indiana University in Bloomington. He regularly appears as a Barrister in the High Court and the Court of Appeal and has argued cases also in the House of Lords and the Privy Council. He was counsel in the foreign marriages case (involving Art. 12 right to marry) and in the ‘funeral pyres’ case (involving Art. 9 right to religious freedom) and sits as a part-time Judge. He was also Consultant in April 2009 to the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) in a programme funded by the British Embassy in Ankara, Turkey, on issues of expulsion, re-admission and voluntary return of migrants, and in 2010, he advised the Government of Bermuda on legislation. He is also a member of the Working Group on Slavery at the Centre for Social Justice, which will report in 2013.

Email: satvinder.juss@kcl.ac.uk
Web: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/law/people/academic/sjuss.aspx

 

Professor Susan Kneebone

Susan Kneebone is a leading international scholar on issues of refugee law, forced migration and human trafficking in the Faculty of Law, Monash University.  She has taken a leading role in introducing research and teaching on refugee law and human trafficking issues into the Faculty.  She supervises many postgraduate students in these fields and is currently Communication Officer for the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM).  Professor Kneebone has made submissions to many public enquiries and frequently handles media enquiries on these issues.

Email: susan.kneebone@monash.edu
Web: http://www.law.monash.edu.au/staff/kneebone/research.html

 

Professor Hélène Lambert

Hélène Lambert is Professor of International law at the University of Westminster. Previously, she has held lectureships at Bristol (UWE), Exeter, and Brunel. She has also held a visiting fellowship at the Refugee Studies Centre in 1999. Hélène is a regular consultant for the Council of Europe (CoE); she also served briefly as a Protection Officer for UNHCR (1996). Hélène has published numerous books and articles on refugee law and human rights, including Seeking Asylum (Martinus Nijhoff, 1995), The Limits of Transnational Law co-edited with Guy S. Goodwin-Gill (CUP, 2010) and International Refugee Law (edited for the Library of Essays in International Law series) (Ashgate, 2010). She has also co-authored a number of inter-disciplinary publications, including International Law and International Relations co-authored with David Armstrong and Theo Farrell (CUP, 2007, now in its second edition).

Email: h.lambert@westminster.ac.uk
Web: http://www.westminster.ac.uk/about-us/directory/lambert-helene

 

Professor Jane McAdam

Jane McAdam is Scientia Professor of Law and the Director of the Andrew & Renata Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law at the University of New South Wales, which was established in 2013.  She is a non-resident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution in Washington DC and a Research Associate at the University of Oxford’s Refugee Studies Centre, and an Associated Senior Fellow at the Fridtjof Nansen Institute in Norway.  She is the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Refugee Law.  Professor McAdam publishes widely in international refugee law and forced migration, with a particular focus on climate change and mobility.  She serves on a number of international committees, including the Nansen Initiative on Disaster-Induced Cross-Border Displacement, the International Law Association Committee on International Law and Sea-Level Rise, and the Asia-Pacific Environmental Migration Network Advisory Board.  She has undertaken consultancies for UNHCR and various governments on issues relating to forced migration and international law, and in 2013 was appointed as a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum.

Email: j.mcadam@unsw.edu.au
Web: www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/jane-mcadam; www.kaldorcentre.unsw.edu.au

 

Professor Stephen Meili

Professor Meili is Director of the University of Minnesota Law School’s Immigration and Human Rights Clinic, where students represent asylum-seekers and detainees. He also teaches Immigration Law, Civil Procedure, and Practice and Professionalism. Stephen Meili’s scholarship focuses on the rights of non-citizens. His current project analyzes the impact of international human rights treaties on asylum law jurisprudence and practice in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.K. and the U.S. During the 2012-13 academic year, he will be an Academic Visitor at the Faculty of Law and a Senior Associate Member of St. Antony’s College at the University of Oxford.

Email: smeili@umn.edu
Web: http://www.law.umn.edu/facultyprofiles/meilis.html

 

Professor Jennifer Moore

Jennifer Moore is Professor of Law at the University of New Mexico, where she teaches courses in International Law, Human Rights Law, and Refugee & Asylum Law.  Her scholarship in the area of international law focuses on the protection of civilians and displaced persons in armed conflict, human rights and development, and transitional justice. Prior to joining the UNM law faculty in 1995, Jennifer Moore worked for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, first as an associate protection officer in West Africa, then as a legal officer in Washington, D.C. In Washington, D.C., she often conducted training sessions on refugee law for government officials, immigrant advocates, and other audiences. She co-authored (with Musalo & Boswell) the first law school casebook on refugee law, Refugee Law and Policy: A Comparative and International Approach (Carolina Academic Press, 4th Ed. 2011). She is member of the National Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, an advisory body to Peace Brigades International.

Email: moore@law.unm.edu
Web: http://lawschool.unm.edu/faculty/moore/index.php

 

Dr. Naohiko Omata

Naohiko is working as Senior Research Officer for the Humanitarian Innovation Project at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford. Between 2009 and 2012, he was Senior Teaching Fellow in Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Previously, he worked as a practitioner and consultant for UNDP, UNHCR and international and local NGOs in Sub-Saharan African countries. His work has published by, among others, Journal of Refugee Studies, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, and Community Development Journal.

Email: naohiko.omata@qeh.ox.ac.uk
Web: http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/people/naohiko-omata 

 

Professor Jaya Ramji-Nogales

Jaya Ramji-Nogales is Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Institute for International Law and Public Policy at Temple University, Beasley School of Law, where she teaches Refugee Law and Policy.  She is the co-author, along with Philip G. Schrag and Andrew I. Schoenholtz, of Refugee Roulette: Disparities in Asylum Adjudication and Proposals for Reform (2009), an empirical study of the US asylum system, and Lives in the Balance: Asylum Adjudication by the Department of Homeland Security (2014), a quantitative and qualitative study of the first level of the asylum process in the United States.  Professor Ramji-Nogales also writes about the intersection of immigration law and international human rights law.

Email: jaya.ramji-nogales@temple.edu
Web: http://www.law.temple.edu/contact/jaya-ramji-nogales/

 

Professor Philip Schrag

Professor Schrag directs Georgetown University’s Center for Applied Legal Studies, in which students represent asylum seekers in U.S. immigration court. Before joining the Law Center faculty in 1981, he was assistant counsel to the NAACP Legal Defense Educational Fund, Consumer Advocate of the City of New York, a professor at Columbia University Law School, and Deputy General Counsel of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. He is the author or co-author of fifteen books, including A Well-founded Fear (2000); Asylum Denied: A Refugee's Struggle for Safety in America (with David Ngaruri Kenney, 2008); and, with Jaya Ramji-Nogales and Andrew I. Schoenholtz, Refugee Roulette: Disparities in Asylum Adjudication and Proposals for Reform (2009) and Lives in the Balance: Asylum Adjudication by the Department of Homeland Security (2014).

Email: schrag@law.georgetown.edu
Web: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/schrag-philip-g.cfm

 

Dr Prakash Shah

Prakash Shah specialises in legal pluralism, ethnic minorities and diasporas in law, immigration, refugee and nationality law, and comparative law. Since 2002 he teaches at the Law Department, Queen Mary, University of London. His publications include Refugees, Race and the Legal Concept of Asylum in Britain (Cavendish, 2000, author), The Challenge of Asylum to Legal Systems (Cavendish, 2005, editor), and Migration, Diasporas and Legal Systems in Europe (Cavendish, 2006, co-editor). He is co-chair of the Migration and Law Network and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Law.

Email: prakash.shah@qmul.ac.uk
Web: http://www.law.qmul.ac.uk/staff/shah.html

 

Dr James Simeon

Dr. James C. Simeon is the Acting Director, Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), and an Associate Professor in the School of Public Policy and Administration (SPPA), Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, at York University, Toronto, Canada. He is currently the immediate-past President of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) and serves as the Coordinator of the International Association of Refugee Law Judges’ (IARLJ) Inter-Conference Working Party Process. His current research in international refugee law covers war crimes and refugee status and the supervision of international refugee law.

Email: jcsimeon@yorku.ca
Web: http://www.yorku.ca/jcsimeon/index.html

 

Dr Dallal Stevens

Dallal Stevens is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Warwick. Her expertise is in the fields of refugee and asylum law, on which she has published widely. Much of her work has revolved around the construction of the asylum seeker within a contemporary perspective, though she has also examined the plight of the refugee in a historical context. Her work adopts a contextual and, at times, comparative approach, and is concerned with highlighting the tension that exists between asylum law and human rights protection in this contentious area. She is currently researching asylum and refugee policies in the Middle East.

Email: d.e.stevens@warwick.ac.uk
Website: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/law/staff/academic/stevens

 

Dr Ralph Wilde

Dr Ralph Wilde is a member of the Faculty of Laws at UCL, London University. His current research focuses on the extraterritorial application of international human rights law. His previous work on the administration of territory by international organizations includes International Territorial Administration: How Trusteeship and the Civilizing Mission Never Went Away (OUP, 2008), awarded the Certificate of Merit (book prize) of the American Society of International Law. He is a member of the Executive Board of the European Society of International Law, having previously served in executive positions at the American Society of International Law and the International Law Association.

Email: ralph.wilde@ucl.ac.uk
Website: https://www.laws.ucl.ac.uk/people/ralph-wilde/