Research affiliates

Ms Hanin Abou Salem

Ms Abou Salem's PhD research focuses on the right of return for Palestinian refugees under international law. Her research interests are in the areas of Refugee and asylum law, statelessness, forced migration, internal displacement and human rights Law. She is also interested in American foreign policy, Middle East politics and the relationship between politics and religion.

Email: AbouSalemH@cardiff.ac.uk

 

Ms Kathryn Allinson

After receiving her Bachelor Degree in Politics with Philosophy from Durham University in 2010, Kathryn started to work for the legal action charity Reprieve, in research and fundraising. She then spent 5 years working for WaterAid, an international development charity, in strategic and programme planning. This provided her the opportunity to travel extensively across sub-Saharan Africa developing monitoring and evaluation techniques in water and sanitation programmes to ensure sustainability of interventions. Whilst working full time, Kathryn completed her GDL in 2013 at BPP Law School and in the academic year 2015, she finished her LLM in International Human Rights Law at Queen Mary University of London. Her dissertation which was rewarded with distinction, discussed the justiciability of the right to water. In addition, Kathryn was awarded the QM Postgraduate Essay Competition in Migration Law prize, for an essay on state accountability for causing refugees flows during the War on Terror campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. This allowed her to present her research at the prestigious Annual Conference of the Society of Legal Scholars in September 2015. In September 2016, Kathryn re-joined the School of Law at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) as a PhD candidate and she was awarded with Queen Mary University of London Research Studentship.

Email: k.l.allinson@qmul.ac.uk

 

Ms Thekli Anastasiou

Thekli Anastasiou is a PhD candidate at the University of Sheffield. Her research focuses on the present stance and future development of international refugee law in relation to asylum seekers fleeing environmental disasters. She is particularly interested in refugees not of a political character and has previously researched the three major regional refugee frameworks (EU, Central America and Africa) in relation to people fleeing environmental disasters, conflict and violence. She teaches on the following courses; Law and Political Philosophies and Public Law in the UK and EU. She is keen on availing opportunities to travel and participate in international events and projects.

Email: tanastasiou1@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Dr Ayar Ata

Ayar Ata completed his PhD in April 2017 at London South Bank University, writing on 'Transnational Migration, Integration, and  Identity: A study of Kurdish diaspora in London'. His research studied the integration experience of the Kurdish Diaspora in London, looking particularly at the reception conditions, and at the uncertain legal conditions of those waiting for a decision on their asylum claims from the UK Home Office. Ayar is a refugee himself (now Ayar claims to be  a Kurdish Londoner, a radical new concept developed in his study for analysing dual identity and belonging among Kurds in London which Ayar has explained fully in his PhD thesis, and it's to be published by Routledge later this year), who carries out health and welfare advocacy work at Southwark Day Centre for Asylum Seekers, and has experience in working with unaccompanied asylum seekers and refugee children in London Town.

Email: ayarata@ymail.com

 

Ms Khalida Azhigulova

Khalida Azhigulova is a PhD Candidate at the University of Leicester. Her research focuses on evaluation of compliance and effectiveness of refugee law in new asylum states in the Central Asian region. She holds a Magister Juris degree from the University of Oxford. In 2009-2015, Khalida was employed with the UNHCR Regional Representation for Central Asia, where she was engaged with RSD, resettlement, local integration, statelessness, legal research, and facilitation of learning programmes. Since 2013, Khalida is a certified UNHCR trainer of protection learning programmes. Khalida’s research interests cover refugee law and policy, human rights law, statelessness and labour migration.

Email: ka243@le.ac.uk

 

Dr Céline Bauloz

Dr Céline Bauloz is Senior Researcher at the Global Migration Centre (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva), Postdoc Researcher for the NCCR – on the Move (University of Fribourg), and Assistant Editor of the Refugee Survey Quarterly (Oxford University Press). She was previously Visiting Researcher at Harvard Law School (MA), and worked as Teaching/Research Assistant for the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights and the University of Lille. Her research interests cover European Union migration law, United States asylum law and the interplay of international refugee law with other branches of international law. Her latest publications include the Research Handbook on International Law and Migration (co-edited with V. Chetail, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014), and “The (Mis)Use of International Humanitarian Law under Article 15(c) of the EU Qualification Directive” (in D.J. Cantor & J.-F. Durieux (eds.), Refuge from Inhumanity? War Refugees and International Humanitarian Law, Martinus Nijhoff, 2014, 247-269).

Email: celine.bauloz@graduateinstitute.ch

 

Ms Sabiha Beg

Sabiha has a strong interest in human rights law and European asylum law. She is a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Law of Heidelberg University in Germany. Her doctoral research focuses on the jurisprudence of the CJEU on the Qualification Directive. In the past, Sabiha worked for the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, the Max Planck Foundation for International Peace and the Rule of Law as well as UNHCR.

Email: beg.sabiha@gmail.com

 

Mr Paolo Biondi

Paolo Biondi is a Doctoral Candidate at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies of the School of Advanced Study, University of London. His research explores the impact of the "Exit" and "Entry" human right principle on the responsibility-sharing in the EU. He works as a free-lance consultant for international law firms and for the EU institutions. Paolo has previously worked for the UNHCR Bureau for Europe, for the Migration Policy Centre (EUI), for the UNHCR Liaison Office to OSCE and Vienna-based UN agencies and at the UNHCR Liaison Office to EASO. He is an associate member of the International Association of Refugee Law Judges where he is involved in the Human Right Nexus working party (EU Chapter).

Email: paolo.biondi@postgrad.sas.ac.uk

 

Ms Emma Borland

Emma Borland is a Ph.D. candidate at Cardiff University funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Her research pathway is Socio-legal Studies (Empirical Studies in Law) and her research topic concerns issues of access to justice for asylum seekers and refugees. Emma has five years experience as an accredited immigration adviser and her work as a practitioner, specialising in asylum cases, has inspired her research interest. She has worked with asylum seekers and refugees since she undertook a 6 months internship in 2008/09 as a legal adviser for the Egypt branch of a UK based NGO, African and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA). Emma is also the newly appointed Chair of Trustees of Asylum Justice, a Welsh charity that provides free legal advice, assistance and representation to asylum seekers and refugees.

Email: borlandej@cardiff.ac.uk

 

Ms Catherine Briddick 

Catherine’s research focuses on responses to violence against women can be found in migration, refugee and human rights law (broadly defined). Catherine is a barrister (now non-practising) who has worked on violence against women issues in the not-for-profit sector for 8 years (including in service delivery and senior management roles), she has taught public international law and international human rights law (at the LSE) and is Chair of Asylum Aid.

Email: catherine.briddick@spc.ox.ac.uk

 

Mr S. Chelvan

Chelvan is a part-time PhD Candidate at King’s College London, where he is writing on “Understanding LGBTI refugees’ lives: moving from Conduct to Identity in Sexual and Gender Identity Asylum Cases in the UK”. Chelvan is a Barrister at No5 Chambers in London and he is a gay rights, immigration and asylum law specialist. He has been instructed by various European NGOs in strategic Strasbourg litigation and has an international reputation in training and lecturing on asylum law to decision-makers, practitioners and activists to enable empowerment of LGBTI asylum seekers and refugees.

Email: sch@no5.com

 

Ms Mathilde Crepin

Mathilde has been researching refugee law as a PhD student at King’s College London since 2015. Her field of research is focused on the interpretation of the notion of persecution in international refugee law. In parallel to her study, she has also been working for the UNHCR in various countries such as Turkey, Thailand, France and Malaysia.

Email: mathilde.crepin@kcl.ac.uk

 

Ms Emily Darling

Emily Darling is a PhD candidate at the Queensland University of Technology. Her thesis focuses on a study of refugee family reunion and family unity in Australia and a critical analysis of the differential treatment towards refugees according to mode of arrival. Her research interests also include a comparative study of refugee family reunification in Australia and the European Union. Emily lectures in immigration and refugee law at QUT and is a solicitor and registered migration agent. She provides pro bono immigration advice at the Refugee and Immigration Legal Service in Brisbane. Emily is also a member of the IASFM and Australian Lawyers for Human Rights. She has tutored in subjects covering administrative law, legal research skills, international law and access to justice issues.

Email: emily.darling@qut.edu.au

 

Ms Pauline Endres de Oliveira

Pauline Endres de Oliveira is a human rights lawyer from Berlin, who worked as Consultant for UNHCR Germany from 2013 - 2015. She is an editorial board member of the Informationsverbund Asyl und Migration (asyl.net), Germany’s main independent institution providing background information for asylum and migration practitioners. She regularly holds lectures in asylum and migration law at the Humboldt University Berlin (Refugee Law Clinic), the University in Bamberg and Amnesty International Germany.

Pauline studied law at the Humboldt University Berlin and the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, with legal traineeships in Brazil, London and Rome. She is now enrolled as a PhD student at the University in Gießen (supervisor: Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bast), focussing on the topic of legal access to international protection in the EU.

Email: pauline.endres-de-oliveira@recht.uni-qiessen.de

 

Ms Didem Doğar 

Didem Doğar is currently pursuing a doctoral degree at McGill University Faculty of Law under the supervision of Professor François Crépeau. Her research focuses on the criminalization of migration and the exclusion clause. She received her LL.M. from McGill University with a thesis titled “The Purpose of the Exclusion Clause and the Role of the UNHCR: Protection or Impunity?” Before embarking on her studies, Didem was working as a refugee status determination assistant at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Turkey where she specialized in exclusion related cases. Didem graduated from Bilkent University in 2010 and is a lawyer before the Istanbul Bar. She has worked as a business lawyer and at the Council of Europe’s Venice Commission.

Email: didem.dogar@mail.mcgill.ca

 

Dr Cristiano D’Orsi

Cristiano is a Research Fellow and Lecturer at the South African Research Chair in International Law (SARCIL)/University of Johannesburg. He received his PhD from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva (Switzerland), with a dissertation on the ‘Specific characteristics and challenges of the protection of asylum-seekers and refugees in Sub-Saharan Africa’. He specializes in the protection of the “people on the move”, while enlarging his expertise in the human rights protection in Africa; as well as in various aspects of the progressive development of Public International Law in the region.

Email: cristianod@uj.ac.za / cdorsi@umich.edu

 

Mr Marco Formisano

Marco's research focuses on the protection of trafficked and smuggled migrants under international law. His general fields of interest are international migration and refugee law, human rights, statelessness and nationality law, international criminal law. He has been working at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees since 2005, initially as a Legal Officer in the Division of International Protection. He is currently the Americas Bureau's Executive Assistant and Desk Officer for North America and the Caribbean. His publications include a number of articles on the 2004 EU Enlargement and more recently on Refugee Policy and Law.

Email: formisan@unhcr.org

 

Ms Luisa Feline Freier

Luisa Feline Freier is a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Government of the London School of Economics (LSE). Feline studies the determinants of policy liberalization in the areas of immigration and asylum in Argentina, Ecuador and Mexico.

Email: l.f.freier@lse.ac.uk

 

Ms Jasmin Fritzsche

Jasmin Fritzsche is a PhD Candidate in International Development Studies at the Institute of Development Research and Development Policy at Ruhr-University Bochum and a Research Fellow in the German-Arab Joint Research, Training, and Networking Programme “From Responsibility to Protect to Responsibility to Assist: Conflict, Reconstruction, and Sustainable Development in the Middle East” (Ruhr-University Bochum/ Lebanese American University).
In her doctoral research she focuses on the protection of Palestinian refugees in cases of forced secondary displacement. Her doctoral research will contribute to the existing literature on the protection of Palestinian refugees and in addition, it will provide empirical evidence through analysis of the most recent displacements of Palestinian refugees from Syria and policies of protection in Egypt and Jordan.

Email: jasmin.fritzsche@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

 

Ms Madeline Garlick

Madeline Garlick is a doctoral candidate at the University of Nijmegen, Netherlands, in the Centre for Migration Law. Her research topic is ‘Solidarity and responsibility-sharing for asylum and international protection in the European Union’ (EU). She worked for 10 years until late 2013 for UNHCR, where she was in charge of its liaison with the EU institutions, and headed the Europe Bureau’s Policy and Legal Support Unit. She is also currently working as an International Migration Initiative Fellow with the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) Europe in Brussels. In addition to solidarity and burden- and responsibility-sharing, her research interests include asylum procedures; resettlement; mixed migration, particularly from North Africa and the Middle East to Europe; displacement from the Syria conflict; and the asylum jurisprudence of the Court of Justice of the EU and the European Court of Human Rights.

Email: madeline@mmrg.be

 

Mr Jean-Pierre Gauci

Jean-Pierre Gauci is a PhD candidate with the School of Law at King’s College London. His doctoral research is on the inter-relations between human trafficking and asylum and specifically whether, and the conditions under which, refugee law offers a means for the protection of trafficked persons. Jean-Pierre is also the founder and director of The People for Change Foundation, and serves as consultant to various entities including the Maltese Government and European and International Organizations.

Email: j.gauci@biicl.org

 

Dr Bríd Ní Ghráinne

Dr Bríd Ní Ghráinne is a lecturer at the University of Sheffield where she researches, supervises, and teaches in the fields of Public International Law and Refugee Law. She is also a lecturer on the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies (distance learning) at the Refugee Law Initiative, University of London. She has held visiting lecturer positions at Shandong University, Weihai, China; the University of Helsinki; and the University of Cyprus. 
Bríd completed her doctorate in 2014 at the University of Oxford under the supervision of Professor Guy S. Goodwin Gill. Her research focused on the relationship between the protection of Internally Displaced Persons and International Refugee Law and was funded by the Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer scholarship, the Peter Birks scholarship, the University of Oxford Graduate Assistance fund, and the National University of Ireland Travelling Studentship. While at Oxford, Bríd coached the Oxford Jessup moot court team, taught International Law and Human Rights to visiting undergraduate law students, and worked as a research assistant in the areas of Human Rights Law and Law of the Sea. Bríd also holds an LLM cum laude from Universiteit Leiden, the Netherlands; a BCL (International) from National University of Ireland, Galway; and diplomas in both Legal French (Law Society of Ireland) and Legal Irish (National University of Ireland, Galway).
Prior to commencing her doctoral studies, Bríd worked as a researcher in the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and completed a judicial clerkship at the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Email: b.a.nighrainne@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Ms Chloë Gilgan

Chloë is a White Rose DTC scholar who was awarded an ESRC scholarship to complete her PhD in Law at the University of York through the Centre for Applied Human Rights. She has graduated cum laude with a juris doctorate of law (JD) from New York Law School and cum laude with a BA degree in Urban Studies and Film from Barnard College, Columbia University. Her dissertation, entitled Localising the Responsibility to Protect: The UK and Syrian Refugees, examines the link between the UK’s commitment to the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) norm and the UK’s resettlement policies on Syrian refugees fleeing mass atrocities.

Email: chloe.gilgan@york.ac.uk

 

Dr Mariagiulia Giuffré

Mariagiulia Giuffré, LLM, PhD (Dist. and Doctor Europaeus certificate), is a Lecturer in Law at Edge Hill University, where she teaches Migration and Refugee Law, EU Law, and Public International Law. Mariagiulia’s research interests are in International and European Law, Refugee Law and Policy, Human Rights and Migration Law. Key works include: “Exploring the Boundaries of Refugee Law” (with Gauci & Tsourdi), Brill 2015; “An Appraisal of Diplomatic Assurances One Year after Othman (Abu Qatada) v UK” (2013) IHRLR 2(2); “State Responsibility beyond Borders” IJRL (2012) 24(4); “Watered-down Rights on the High Seas” (2012) ICLQ 61(2); and “Readmission Agreements and Refugee Rights” (2013) RSQ 32(3). Mariagiulia is also part of a project jointly convened by the Centre for International Criminal Justice (Free University of Amsterdam) and the RLI. The title of the project is “Undesirable and Unreturnable? Excluded Asylum-seekers and Other Migrants Suspected of Serious Criminality but Who Cannot Be Removed.”

Email: giuffrem@edgehill.ac.uk

 

Ms Mariana Gkliati

Mariana Gkliati is a PhD researcher and lecturer at the Institute of Immigration Law of Leiden University. Her doctoral research focuses on legal accountability and effective legal protection of individuals against human rights violations in the area of asylum and immigration attributed to the EU agency Frontex. She lectures in MA and Bachelor programmes on European Asylum Law and Migration Law and Policy in Europe. She also holds an editorial board position at the Refugee Law Initiative Working Paper Series (University of London), and is an External Affiliate to Statewatch (Frontex Observatory). Her work experience is shared among Vienna, Athens, and Leiden. She has previously worked at the EU Fundamental Rights Agency in the area of asylum, migration, and borders and as a legal case reporter and commentator for Oxford Reports on International Law. She has had an earlier carrier as a journalist, covering stories mainly on education and civil and social rights, and has voluntarily worked for the Greek NGO AITIMA,  which provides legal and social aid to asylum seekers and refugees.

Email: m.gkliati@law.leidenuniv.nl

 

Ms Brenda Goddard Atli

Brenda is a doctoral candidate at the University of Geneva. Her research focuses on the status of Palestinian refugees in international refugee law and public international law. She is also interested in the global politics of forced migration. She has worked with UNHCR since 1997, with posts in Moscow, Skopje, Geneva and most recently, Ankara, and is currently on study leave from UNHCR in order to pursue her doctoral studies.

Email: Brenda.Goddard@etu.unige.ch

 

Ms Beatrice Gornati

Beatrice Gornati (Rho, 1988), after a Bachelor’s Degree in Linguistic and Cultural Mediation, obtained a Master’s Degree in International Relations at the University of Milan with a thesis on migrants’ push-backs under an International Law perspective. After graduation, Beatrice worked as monitoring immigration operator in East Sicily, with the NGO Borderline Sicilia Onlus. Since September 2015, she is a Ph.D. student in International and European Law, with a focus on the topic of The Fights against Migrants’ Smuggling in International and European law. Her research, carried out under the supervision of Professor Marco Pedrazzi and Ilaria Viarengo, concerns international judicial cooperation among States for the contrast of migrants’ smuggling, without neglecting the impact these operations may have on human rights of smuggled migrants.

Email: beatrice.gornati@unimi.it

 

Ms Naoko Hashimoto 

Naoko has more than a decade of practitioner experience on refugees and forced migration issues, as a staff member of UNHCR, IOM and the Government of Japan. Her current doctoral research theme is refugee resettlement to Japan, analysing reasons why non-immigration countries such as Japan accept refugees through resettlement, using political and international relations theories. Her other interests include: asylum and immigration law, human rights of migrants, mixed-migration, trafficking and smuggling, nationality, IDPs, rescue-at-sea, and other migration related issues.

Email: n.hashimoto@sussex.ac.uk

 

Ms Claire Higgins

Claire Higgins is a doctoral candidate in Economic and Social History at the University of Oxford. She is researching the development of Australian refugee policy during the late 1970s and early 1980s, including political and procedural features of refugee status determination. Claire will hold the Margaret George Award at the National Archives of Australia in 2014, where she will research Australia’s in-country resettlement programme in Latin America.

Email: c.higgins@unsw.edu.au

 

Ms Ghofran Hilal

Ghofran Hilal is a PhD student in Public Law at the faculty of law (University of Lyon, France). Her research focuses on the international protection of refugees in particular the protection of women refugees in mass influx situation more specifically the case of refugees in Jordan. She worked as a research and teaching assistant at the Faculty of Law at the University of Jordan. She accumulated two years of legal (both Regular and Sharia) training in the Jordanian Bar Association while working as a volunteer researcher and translator for Amman Centre for Human Rights Studies. Ghofran holds a LLB in Law from the University of Jordan and LLM in Human Rights from the University of Lyon, France. She speaks Arabic, English and French.

Email: gofran97@yahoo.com

 

Ms Yewa Holiday

Yewa Holiday is a PhD candidate and Graduate Teaching Assistant at the School of Law, Queen Mary, University of London. Her research considers why asylum seekers and refugees are prosecuted for offences relating to entry to or presence in England, Wales and Northern Ireland contrary to article 31(1) of the Refugee Convention. She was born in Sierra Leone and has worked in Japan, Spain and Jamaica. Yewa worked for the Criminal Cases Review Commission from 1998-2013; she specialised in cases involving refugees and victims of human trafficking and conducted training and seminars. She is a barrister (non-practising) of England and Wales (Middle Temple) and has LLMs in International Law (Cambridge)and International Criminal Law (Sussex).

Email: y.s.holiday@qmul.ac.uk

 

Dr Vanessa Holzer

Dr Vanessa Holzer is academic coordinator at the University of Tübingen. Previously, she was based at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law in Cambridge. As British Red Cross Senior Research Fellow, she led a team of researchers for the project on customary IHL of the British Red Cross and the ICRC. Vanessa also worked at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg. She holds a doctorate from the Goethe University in Frankfurt and an LLM from the LSE where she received the Blackstone Chambers Prize.

Email: vanessa.holzer@yahoo.de

 

Ms Nora Honkala

Nora Honkala is a PhD Candidate and a Teaching Fellow at University of Reading School of Law. She is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Her thesis, entitled “Forced Marriages, International Law and the Rights of Asylum Seeker Women”, examines the extent and the ways in which the domestic application of international law plays a role in the protection of asylum seeker women’s rights in forced marriage cases. Her broad interest areas are gender and asylum, international law, socio-legal studies and feminist theory.

Email: n.a.honkala@reading.ac.uk

 

Ms Claire Eloise Inder

Claire Inder is a PhD Candidate at the University of Geneva. Her doctoral research focuses on the legal relevance of international cooperation within the global refugee protection regime, and is being supervised by Professor Guy Goodwin-Gill (University of Oxford) and Professor Laurence Boisson de Chazournes (University of Geneva). Claire currently works for UNHCR in Geneva. She previously worked in the Department of Public International Law and International Organization at the University of Geneva, as with well as Lalive, White & Case and the Embassy of Australia in Washington DC. She has a Masters in International Law from the New York University School of Law (Hauser Global Scholar), and a Bachelor of Arts/Laws from the University of New South Wales (University Medal in Law). She also studied at Harvard University, on the Harvard Travel Scholarship, and Aix-Marseille University in France. She is admitted as a Lawyer to the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Australia.

Email: inder@unhcr.org

 

Ms Meltem Ineli

Meltem Ineli is a PhD Candidate at the University of Bristol. Her research focuses on temporary protection of refugees in mass influx situations. She is examining the theoretical framework of the temporary protection and different state practice. She reviews various temporary protection practices in Europe, Australia, the US and Asia. Given increasing rates of internal conflicts and the number of displaced persons, her research aims to determine whether the available temporary protection systems provide effective temporary protections.

Email: meltem.IneliCiger@bristol.ac.uk

 

Ms Eleni Karageorgiou

Eleni Karageorgiou is a qualified lawyer (Athens Bar Association) and a PhD candidate in public international law at Lund University, Sweden. Her research explores the functions and implications of the principle of solidarity and responsibility sharing in EU asylum law and policies and forms part of the Lund/Uppsala Migration Law Network (L/UMIN) http://migrationlawnetwork.org/en/. Prior to commencing her doctoral studies, Eleni worked for the Greek Asylum Appeal Committees and before that, in migration law practice. Her research interests include theory of international law, international and regional human rights systems, non-citizens’ rights, refugee law and gender, the Common European Asylum System, ECtHR and CJEU asylum jurisprudence.

Email: Eleni.Karageorgiou@jur.lu.se 

 

Ms Elizabeth G. Kennedy

Elizabeth G. Kennedy is a Ph.D. student in geography at UC-Santa Barbara and San Diego State University. She researches the migratory experiences of unaccompanied child migrants from Central America and Mexico to the United States, which builds upon the mentorship and tutoring she provided to four unaccompanied minors from Afghanistan while in the UK and to undocumented youth in Texas while an undergraduate. She completed her MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies at the University of Oxford in July 2011 and received a Bachelor of Arts in Government and Humanities from the University of Texas in 2007.

Email: ekennedy@rohan.sdsu.edu

 

Mr Tawseef Khan

Tawseef Khan is a PhD candidate at the School of Law and Social Justice, University of Liverpool. He is a graduate of the University of Manchester, and of University College London, where he completed a Masters in Intellectual Property Law. Having chosen a change in direction, as a result of his advocacy work and activism, he is currently researching the fairness and efficiency of the British asylum system from the perspective of individuals claiming asylum on grounds of their sexual orientation. He writes a blog called ‘Rethinking the British Asylum System for LGB Refugees‘.

Email: tawseef.Khan@liverpool.ac.uk

 

Ms Vickie Knox

Vickie Knox is in the final stage of her PhD in Human Rights at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, from where she previously graduated with MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights. Her doctoral research explores the links between organised crime and migration in Mesoamerica, in the context of the emerging protection crisis in the region. Her thesis analyses how violent criminal groups drive migrations, are a threat during during migratory transit and control people smuggling operations. Vickie previously worked on equality and discrimination and on reproductive rights and access to abortion, with a particular focus on Latin America, and was a co-director of the Central America Woman's Network. She has considerable experience in communications and campaigns and has held senior roles in advocacy organisations including Amnesty International and International Alert, and worked as an independent consultant for several years. She also holds degrees from Queen Mary University of London and University of Brighton, and her other research interests include international human rights law, equality and discrimination, and reproductive rights.

Email: vickie_knox@hotmail.com

 

Mr Julian Lehmann

Julian Lehmann is working on a doctoral project about home state protection in EU asylum law, supervised at the Dresden University of Technology, Germany. He is a research associate at the Global Public Policy Institute in Berlin, where he contributes to the human rights program. He has research and consulting experience for the European Council on Refugees and Exiles, for the International Institute of Human Rights in Strasbourg, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and INTERIGHTS in London. He was a research scholar at the University of Michigan in 2012. His doctoral project is funded by the Villigst Foundation.

Email: jlehmann@gppi.net

 

Ms Izabella Majcher

Izabella Majcher is a PhD candidate in International Law at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva. Her doctoral research focuses on the European Union return policy and its compliance with international human rights law. Izabella also works as a researcher at the Global Detention Project, which is an independent centre based in Geneva, dedicated to the research on immigration detention in countries around the world. Izabella is also a volunteer detention monitor with the Ligue suisse des droits de l'Homme and regularly visits the places of immigration detention.

Email: izabella.majcher@graduateinstitute.ch

 

Mr Nicholas Maple

Nick's PhD originated from research he completed for his dissertation on the MA in Understanding Human Rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies. The dissertation analysed how states in Africa deny refugees the fundamental right of freedom of movement in camps and government-run settlements. Nicholas has nearly two years experience working in the field as a volunteer advocate for organisations such as Asylum Access, NRC and UNHCR. He teaches on MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies at the Refugee Law Initiative and has worked as a researcher at the Refugee Law Initiative and completed consultancy work for Chatham House.

Email: nicholasjmaple@gmail.com

 

Ms Elizabeth Mavropoulou

Elizabeth has read law in Athens  (University of Athens, LLB) and in the United Kingdom (University of Westminster, LLM International Law). Her general research interests are public international law, international refugee and human rights law, international humanitarian law and the law of the sea. Having worked in private practice in Greece and as a research and legal assistant with UK Charity Human Rights at Sea, Elizabeth returned to academia. She is currently researching the concept of responsibility-sharing in international refugee law under the prism of the principle of common but differentiated responsibility, for the purposes of understanding its potential as a guiding principle to the Refugee Convention’s implementation.  Elizabeth is also genuinely interested in the interplay of international law and international relations.

Email: Elisavet.mavropoulou@my.westmintser.ac.uk​

 

Ms Rowena Moffatt

Rowena is undertaking a DPhil in law at the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford University. Her research examines procedural fairness in migration law. It reviews the theoretical basis on which procedures are allocated in migration law and applies the conclusions to consider and critique aspects of the procedural system that applies to certain types of migrant in the United Kingdom legal order. Rowena was called to the Bar of England and Wales in 2009 and maintains a practice in immigration and asylum law. She has also written on various aspects of refugee and migration law. This includes a practitioner textbook on expulsion and exclusion from the United Kingdom and practice notes for Lexis Nexis. Rowena worked as judicial assistant to Lord Dyson MR at the Supreme Court for a year prior to starting her DPhil and has completed a Masters in European Union Law at the College of Europe, Belgium as well as an internship at the Council of Europe. She is convenor of the Refugee and Migration Law Discussion Group at Oxford and the Access to Justice Subcommittee of the Immigration Law Practitioners' Association.

Email: r.moffatt@doughtystreet.co.uk

 

Ms Stephanie Motz

Stephanie is a part-time PhD candidate at the University of Lucerne, Switzerland, where she writes on the qualification for refugee status of disabled persons. She is a barrister currently practising in Switzerland, where she regularly represents asylum applicants before the UN Committee Against Torture and the European Court of Human Rights, having successfully represented the applicant in A.A. v. Switzerland. Stephanie previously worked as a barrister in the UK and remains a door tenant there. She has taught public law at King’s College London and now teaches on the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies at the Refugee Law Initiative and gives an introductory course on Swiss immigration and asylum law in Zurich. Stephanie completed the Bachelor of Civil Law at the University of Oxford as well as internships at the International Criminal Court and the Greek Council for Refugees. She regularly publishes in the field of asylum law, immigration law and human rights

Email: stephanie.motz@stud.unilu.ch

 

Mr Frank McNamara

Frank Mc Namara is a PhD Researcher at the European University Institute where he pursues research on State responsibility for migration control and border management which has been externalised and/or privatised. Frank previously worked in the Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner and in the Refugee Appeals Tribunal in Ireland and as a Trainee at the European Commission in the Unit for Border Management Schengen Governance/Relations with Frontex. Frank has also worked as a Research Assistant in the Migration Policy Centre (MPC) in the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies. As a Research Assistant in the MPC, he has researched and written about refugee resettlement in the EU and the detention of third country nationals prior to removal.

Email: Frank.McNamara@EUI.eu

 

Ms Ceren Mutus Toprakseven

Ceren holds a Bachelor Degree in Law from Koc University and a LLM in Public International Law from Kings College London, Dickson Poon School of Law as a British Council Chevening Scholar. She has eight years of work experience as a legal researcher at International Strategic Research Organisation (USAK), Center for European Union Studies.In September 2015, she joined the School of Law at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) as a PhD candidate and she was awarded with Queen Mary University of London Research Studentship. Ceren is also a registered lawyer at Istanbul Bar Association.
Ceren’s PhD research concentrates on the concept of shared responsibility in migration controls. It particularly aims to identify the limits and challenges, if any, imposed by prevailing principles and establish to what extent the principle of joint (and several) responsibility can be applied to extraterritorial/ privatised migration controls.

Email: cerenmutus@gmail.com

 

Ms Emanuela Parisciani

Emanuela Parisciani is in the final stage of her PhD in Politics, Human Rights and Sustainability at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa. She holds a LL.M from the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law, an MA in International Relations cum laude from the University of Macerata and a BA in Journalism cum laude from LUMSA, Rome. She has a special interest in international refugee law, human rights and international humanitarian law, and EU immigration and asylum law. The focus of her doctoral research is on the role of the Court of Justice of the European Union in interpreting the provisions of the Common European Asylum System, in particular those of the Qualification Directive. During the Fall 2012, Emanuela spent 4 months as a Visiting Research Scholar, University of Michigan Law School, Department of International and Comparative Law and conducted the initial bulk of her PhD research under the supervision of Prof. Hathaway. She also took part to the SJD Research Scholar Colloquium. In the past years, Emanuela volunteered for Amnesty International Italy.

Email: e.parisciani@alumni.sssup.it

 

Mr Jason Pobjoy

Jason Pobjoy is a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, where his research explores the relationship between international refugee law and international law on the rights of the child. He is the founding Chair of the Cambridge Pro Bono Project. He is an Australian qualified lawyer, and a barrister of England and Wales (Honourable Society of the Inner Temple), and practiced for three years as a litigation solicitor at what was then Mallesons Stephen Jaques. He completed a Masters in Law at the University of Melbourne and the Bachelor of Civil Law at the University of Oxford, and has also been a Research Associate at the Refugee Law Project at Makerere University in Kampala and a Hauser Visiting Doctoral Researcher at New York University School of Law. Jason has published in the areas of refugee law, human rights law and civil procedure.

Email: jasonpobjoy@blackstonechambers.com

 

Ms Jenny Poon

Jenny Poon is a Ph.D. candidate at the Faculty of Law of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, and a Barrister & Solicitor in Ontario, Canada. Jenny's research involves a comparative analysis of the principle of non-refoulement as a norm in both international and European Union law. Jenny has published in a variety of mediums, including in the European Papers, the McGill Journal of International Law & Legal Pluralism, and the Groningen Journal of International Law. Recent academic conference presentations include the Refugee Law Initiative, Birmingham Law School, University of East Anglia Law School, Michigan State University (US), York University (Canada), as well as her own Faculty of Law.

Email: jpoonlaw@gmail.com

 

Ms Christel Querton

Christel is a PhD candidate funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council at Newcastle University. Her research examines whether women and girls who flee armed conflicts and seek international protection in the European Union (‘EU’) are adequately protected in a manner which takes account of specific forms of gender-related persecution or gender-based violence and in particular the gender-differentiated impact of armed conflict. The research aims to critically analyse the law, jurisprudence and policy in the EU by looking at selected Member States (Belgium, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom) to determine the way in which EU Member States implement and interpret international and European refugee and human rights law standards in the asylum claims of women and girls who flee armed conflict and generalised violence.
Christel was called to the Bar of England and Wales in 2013 (Middle Temple) and is an asylum, immigration and human rights barrister at Lamb Building. She is also a Trustee of the Asylum Research Consultancy Foundation and a member of the Women’s Project Advisory Committee at Asylum Aid. Christel was previously employed at Asylum Aid and Wilson Solicitors LLP.

Email: C.Querton2@ncl.ac.uk 

 

Ms Sally Richards

Sally is a Sessional Lecturer and PhD Candidate at the University of New South Wales, Australia. Her PhD research examines appeal level decision making in the Refugee Review Tribunal of Australia. It considers how refugee adjudicators apply different concepts of administrative justice to their refugee protection visa assessments. Sally has previously been a seconded researcher through the University of Sydney Policy, Innovation, Research and Evaluation Unit at the Department of Immigration and Citizenship Canberra, part of the Forced Migration Research Group at the University of New South Wales and Research Assistant at the University of Sydney. She has also been Vice President of the University of Sydney Amnesty International Society, part of the Refugee Team at Amnesty International, a Board Member of the Refugee Council of Australia and an intern at the Refugee Advice and Casework Service, NSW.

Email: sal.richards@gmail.com

 

Dr Dana Schmalz

Dana Schmalz is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity in Göttingen, in the department Law, Ethics, Politics. Her work focuses on questions of refugee law as intertwined with assumptions about the boundaries of politics and political community. Dana wrote her doctoral dissertation at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public and International Law in Heidelberg, being part of the cluster of excellence “Normative Orders” at the University of Frankfurt. In 2016, she studied in the LL.M-program “Comparative Legal Thought” at the Cardozo School of Law, New York. In Spring 2017, Dana teaches at Freie Universität Berlin a course on “Refugee Law from a Democratic Theory Perspective”.

Email: Schmalz@mmg.mpg.de

 

Ms Jessica Schultz

Jessica Schultz, PhD, has published numerous articles on the internal protection alternative in refugee law. Currently, Jessica works as a reseacher at the Chr Michelsen Institute in Bergen. She has previousl worked with Oxfam GB, UNHCR, and the Ford Foundation. Jessica was a Visiting Study Fellow at the Refugee Studies Centre during Michaelmas Term 2012.

Email: jessica.Schultz@cmi.no

 

Mr Matthew Scott

Matthew Scott is UK-qualified solicitor and a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Law at Lund University in Sweden. His research examines the scope of international protection from environmentally-related harm in an era of climate change. Through interviews with lawyers and judges, as well as doctrinal analysis, the research maps current law and practice and explores the potential role of strategic litigation in developing the scope of protection. Prior to commencing his doctoral research Matthew worked for the Immigration Advisory Service in London as well as in private immigration and asylum practice.

Email: matthew.scott@jur.lu.se

 

Dr Marina Sharpe

Marina Sharpe is an Arnold & Blema Steinberg Post-Doctoral Fellow in International Migration Law and Policy at the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, Faculty of Law, McGill University. Marina completed her doctorate in law at the University of Oxford, where she was a Trudeau Scholar. Her thesis, supervised by Professor Guy Goodwin-Gill, was about refugee protection in Africa. She is called to the bars of England & Wales (Inner Temple) and New York, and spent over two years in private practice at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP in New York and London. Prior to this, she worked as a legal advisor with the Refugee Law Project of Makerere University in Kampala, and later returned to Uganda as legal officer of the International Refugee Rights Initiative. Marina regularly undertakes consultancy work for organizations including Amnesty International, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and UNHCR. She has taught at the Universities of London, Oxford and Sherbrooke and has guest lectured at Georgetown, McGill, Oxford, the University of Tripoli and Yale. Her scholarly work has been published in several peer-reviewed journals and edited collections, as well as by UNHCR. In addition to her doctorate, she holds common and civil law degrees from McGill, an MSc in development studies from the LSE and a BA in economics and international development from McGill.

Email: Marina.Sharpe@london.ac.uk

 

Dr Sarah Singer

Dr Sarah Singer is an academic at the Refugee Law Initiative and Lecturer in Human Rights Law at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Sarah is also Managing Editor of the International Community Law Review, a peer reviewed academic journal published by Brill; Martinus Nijhoff. She is Programme Director of the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies (launching October 2014), the first postgraduate distance learning programme of its kind, run by the Refugee Law Initiative and delivered through the prestigious University of London International Programmes. She also teaches the law component of the MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights at the Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study, University of London. Sarah’s research interests are in refugee law and policy, human rights and migration. She specialises in and has a number of publications on the topic of exclusion from refugee status. Her current research addresses the challenges posed to national and international public policy by asylum seekers who are suspected of serious criminality but cannot be removed from the territory of the host State. Sarah previously worked as an immigration caseworker at the House of Commons and has received a number of awards for her research including the prestigious Modern Law Review Scholarship.

Email: sarah.singer@sas.ac.uk

 

Ms Rachel Slater

Rachel is a PhD candidate under the supervision of Dr Martin Borowski at the University of Birmingham, Law School. After completing an undergraduate degree in German and History and a Master in International Studies, she obtained a Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies in 2009. From 2009-2012 Rachel was a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant at Birmingham Law School teaching Public Law and Property Law. She has also assisted with the recent Supreme Court case of KM.

Email: rhs236@bham.ac.uk

 

Dr Vladislava Stoyanova

Dr Vladislava Stoyanova, Postdoctoral fellow and Lecturer in Migration Law and Human Rights Law, Faculty of Law, Lund University; Member of the editorial board of the Refugee Law Initiative Working Paper Series. Vladislava’s research interests cover human rights law, refugee law, migration law, human trafficking and slavery. She focuses on the European Court of Human Rights' case law under Article 3, 4 and 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. She is the author of Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered. Conceptual Limits and States' Positive Obligations in European Law (Cambridge University Press, 2017 www.cambridge.org/9781107162280) For her publications visit also http://works.bepress.com/vladislava_stoyanova/.

Email: vladislava.stoyanova@jur.lu.se

 

Ms Isabelle Swerissen

Isabelle Swerissen is a Ph.D candidate at the Amsterdam Center for International Law of the University of Amsterdam. Her research is part of the SHARES project on Shared Responsibility in International Law (www.sharesproject.nl). In her research, Isabelle focuses on responsibility allocation arrangements and protection of refugees. The research addresses the interaction between international refugee law, international human rights law and the law of state responsibility and is conducted under supervision of Professor André Nollkaemper and Professor Marjoleine Zieck. In addition, Isabelle is a regular contributor on developments in the UN Human Rights system in Geneva and New York to the NJCM-Bulletin and is chairperson and founding member of the ESIL Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law. Isabelle has degrees in Public International Law (2009) and International Relations (2010) from the University of Amsterdam. In the course of an academic exchange, she spent a semester at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia (2007).

Email: I.Swerissen@uva.nl

 

Mr Nikolas Feith Tan

Nikolas Feith Tan is a PhD fellow at the Danish Institute for Human Rights and Aarhus University in international refugee law. His doctorate looks at state cooperation in the field of migration control. He teaches courses related to international refugee law with Aarhus University, Aalborg University and the University of London’s MA in Refugee Protection & Forced Migration Studies. Nikolas is also a legal advisor at the Danish Refugee Council and editor of Asylum Insight (www.asyluminsight.com). An Australian lawyer admitted to practice, Nikolas is a former officer of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Email: nita@humanrights.dk

 

Dr Evangelia (Lilian) Tsourdi 

Lilian Tsourdi is a Max Weber Fellow at the Law Department of the European University Institute (EUI). She is a module convenor and tutor at the School of Advanced Studies of the University of London and a visiting lecturer at: the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB); Sciences Po Paris; Queen Mary University of London (QMUL); and the University of Turin. Lilian holds a PhD from the Law Faculty (Institute for European Studies) of the ULB. She also holds an LLM in International Human Rights Law from the University of Essex and an LLM in Public International Law from the University of Athens. Her current research focuses on the administrative governance of the EU asylum policy and EU funding in selected policy areas. She regularly undertakes consultancy work for EU institutions and international and non-governmental organisations. She was most recently employed as researcher at the Migration Policy Centre of the EUI, the ULB and at the UCL, and as advisor for a Member of the European Parliament.

Email: liliantsourdi@gmail.com

 

Mr Hugh Tuckfield

Hugh is a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney, his thesis is titled "The Power of Norms: Protracted Refugee Situations in Nepal". Hugh's interests lie in the study of human rights with a focus on refugee studies and forced migration, particularly in South Asia. He holds a Master Degree in Human Rights and Democratisation (Asia & Pacific region) from the University of Sydney, and Bachelor of Economics and a Bachelor of Laws from Monash University. He has been a guest lecturer in the Master of Human Rights and Democratisation program at the University of Sydney, and a visiting lecturer in refugee studies and professional legal English at the Kathmandu School of Law. He has also acted as a consultant to the UNDP and the SNV. In 2016 Hugh was a Visiting Merit Research Fellow at the WZB Social Sciences Centre in Berlin , and a Visiting Study Fellow at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford in 2017. 

Email: hst0101@gmail.com
Web: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/sociology_social_policy/postgrad/research_students.shtml#htuckfield

 

Ms Christina Velentza

Christina Velentza was an Academy Stavros Niarchos Foundation Fellow with the International Law Programme and Europe Programme, Chatham House in 2015-16. She is a policy advisor, an attorney at law and legal adviser with the Athens Bar Association, Greece. She has worked for the Greek Asylum Service (Ministry of Interior) in partnership with UNHCR on refugee status determination procedure and assessment of claims for international protection. She has previously worked for the EEAS, Legal Service in the General Secretariat of the Council of the EU and NGOs in the field of human rights. 
Her research interests are International and European law, international refugee law, migration, internal displacement and international cooperation and she is currently researching the cooperation between Greece and Turkey through the Syrian refugee crisis in the Mediterranean. Christina is a PhD candidate in international refugee law and human rights (Greek State Foundation Scholar), holds her MA in European Studies (Law) from the University of Strasbourg and her BA in Law from the Demokriteion University of Thrace, Greece.

Email: cvelentza@chathamhouse.org

 

Ms Denise Venturi

Denise Venturi is a PhD candidate in International Law and Human Rights at Scuola Sant'Anna (Italy) and KU Leuven (Belgium). Her research investigates the use of the vulnerability concept in the context of SOGI-based asylum claims. Currently, she works as a Legal officer at ECRE (European Council on Refugees and Exiles) focusing on strategic litigation. She has been a Visiting Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology and a Honorary Research Assistant at the University of Liverpool. Denise holds a Master's Degree in Law and a Postgraduate Degree in Asylum and Immigration Law from the University of Florence, as well as European master's Degree in Human Rights and Democratisation from EIUC (Venice) and KU Leuven. Previously she has worked as a criminal defence and immigration lawyer in Italy, where she was admitted to the Bar in 2013. Denise has interned with UNHCR Bureau for Europe and PICUM and has several years of experience as a volunteer with NGOs dealing with refugees and migrants' rights. Her research interests focus on RSD, rules of evidence, securitisation and gender issues.

Email: d.venturi@sssup.it

 

Ms Giulia Vicini

Giulia is a Ph.D. candidate at Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne in co-supervision with the University of Milan. Her research focuses on the articulation between the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) and the 1951 Geneva Convention related to the status of refugee. Giulia also works as a trainee lawyer assisting primarily applicants for international protection. Previously, she has interned with the UNHCR and worked with several local NGOs.

Email: giulia.vicini@unimi.it

 

Ms Janna Wessels 

Janna is Quentin Bryce Doctoral Scholar at the University of Technology, Sydney and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Her research explores the role of the claimant’s behaviour in gender- and sexuality based refugee status determinations. She is research associate for a large international comparative study on Gender Related Harms in Forced Migration. Janna completed a Master of Science in Forced Migration at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford. She is co-founder and Vice Chair of the Oxford Monitor of Forced Migration (OxMo).

Email: Janna.Wessels@recht.uni-giessen.de​

 

Ms Katharine T. Weatherhead

Ms Katharine T. Weatherhead is undertaking a PhD in Law at Queen Mary University of London. She was awarded an MA Hons in International Relations and Law from the University of Edinburgh (2014) and an MSc in Refugee and Forced Migration Studies from the University of Oxford (2016). Katharine's primary research interest is EU asylum law and policy, and her previous work has appeared in Forced Migration Review and Open Democracy. The working title of her doctoral thesis is: "Unravelling Mediterranean Migration: Legal and political knowledge creation and diffusion among asylum seekers, refugees and migrants". 

Email: k.t.weatherhead@qmul.ac.uk

 

Ms Tamara Wood

Tamara Wood is currently undertaking a PhD investigating the impact of the expanded refugee definition in the OAU Refugee Convention. Tamara has previously worked in the areas of refugee law and administrative law and has experience teaching and tutoring in law, philosophy, applied ethics and research skills at the University of New South Wales, University of Melbourne and Chisholm Institute of TAFE. She has degrees in law, philosophy and education and her other research interests include international human rights law, humanitarian law and legal theory.

Email: tamara.wood@unsw.edu.au

 

Dr Ruvi Ziegler

Dr Reuven (Ruvi) Ziegler is a tenured Lecturer in Law at the University of Reading, where he is Programme Director of the LLM in Human Rights, International Law, and Advanced Legal Studies. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Working Paper Series, Refugee Law Initiative, University of London; Academic Fellow of the Inner Temple; Research Associate, Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford; and the Civil Liberties & Human Rights Section Convenor of the Society of Legal Scholars. Ruvi is also a researcher at the Israel Democracy Institute, analysing the treatment of African asylum seekers in Israel as part of the Institute's ‘Democratic Principles; project.
Ruvi's areas of research interest include Citizenship & Electoral Rights, International Refugee Law, Comparative Constitutional Law, and International Humanitarian Law. His recently published book: 'Voting Rights of Refugees' (Cambridge University Press, 2017). Previously, Ruvi was a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School’s Immigration and Refugee Clinic and with the Human Rights Program; and a Tutor in Public International Law at Oxford. Ruvi holds DPhil, MPhil, and BCL degrees from Oxford; an LLM (with specialisation in public law) from Hebrew University; and an LLB, BA (Economics) from Haifa. He was called to the Israeli bar in 2003.

Email: r.ziegler@reading.ac.uk